Your Giving at Work in 2018: Annual Report

Your gifts make a difference for WMU ministries like Christian Women’s Job Corps. Akevia was down on her luck when she found CWJC. She was helping others, maintaining a 4.0 grade point average in school, working multiple jobs, and learning how to be a new mom. Akevia’s dream was to become a teacher, and it was clear that she would be a natural as she helped others at her CWJC site when they struggled with classes.

 
Generational poverty ended with me because of all of you.
— Akevia Wilson
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The Dove Endowment helped Akevia reach goals she never thought possible. When she received the Sybil Bentley Dove Award in 2018, she said, “I am a few months away from becoming what and who I was destined to be. God has used my journey to strengthen my faith. Because of these organizations and the wonderful Christian people who have helped and encouraged us, my son will not have to experience food insecurity or homelessness. Generational poverty ended with me because of all of you.”

Akevia is now a third grade math and science teacher and will soon begin graduate school.


2018 Annual Report

Total Granted: $1,600,000

Granted to National WMU: $615,000

Scholarships: For MKs: $58,000

SCHOLARSHIPS: For Others: $44,000

Women’s Leadership Development: $217,000

State WMU Organizations: $172,000

Receiving scholarships from the WMU Foundation was critical to helping me finish my seminary degree. Because of the generous gifts of many donors, I was able to depend less on student loans and feel less financial pressure both in school and following graduation. I’m presently working at Samford University as a Student Financial Services Advisor and VA Certification Officer. Now I’m able to help current seminary students and other college students as they prepare their finances for education. Though it’s not traditional ministry, I’m getting to connect with a variety of students and families as they face the challenge of paying for school.
— David Dockery, Beeson Divinity School graduate & WMU/WMU Foundation Scholarship Recipient
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Partnering with Purpose

I remember being in school on those days when the teacher let us know we needed to choose a partner to work on a project together. It was always a little anxiety-inducing because what if someone else chose your best friend or, even worse, no one wanted to partner with you? What if there wasn’t an even number of children in the class and you had to partner with the teacher? That could be embarrassing. Or what if you got partnered with that kid who didn’t pull his own weight and you ended up doing all the work?

You never knew what you would get when you had to partner up in school. It could be great, but it could also be absolutely terrible. If you were anything like me, you tried to make the most of the situation and hoped for the best.

All this to say, if you’re having anxious flashbacks to rough days in elementary school, I can put your mind at ease. At the WMU Foundation, we want to partner with you, but only in ways that benefit everyone.

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When you partner with us, we’ll help you find your missions passion.

Natalie Shannon, administrative assistant at national WMU, is passionate about social justice issues, so she partners with the WMU Foundation when she gives monthly to the Judith and David Hayes Endowment to Combat Human Trafficking. “I give because of how clearly scripture mandates fighting for the oppressed,” she explained. “Fighting for those enslaved by others is a very real, practical way to show love and display the gospel.”

We have churches that partner with us, as well. Mountain Brook Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, has given since the WMU Foundation’s inception twenty-five years ago. “World missions has always been a priority for our church,” said June Whitlow, a long-time church member. “Since the Foundation regularly grants funds to ministries all over the world, this enables a portion of an individual’s initial gift to keep on giving and giving, long after the giver is gone. This pleases Mountain Brook Baptist Church members,” Whitlow continued.

When you partner with us, you can make personal connections.

“It’s easy to give when you see firsthand the impact of your giving,” said Lena Plunk, national WMU CWJC ministry consultant. “As a former Christian Women’s Job Corps (CWJC) site coordinator, I know that giving to the CWJC/CMJC Special Fund directly impacts the lives of these men and women. I have heard their stories and know that my giving is helping to impact a life.”

Emily Swader, WorldCrafts marketing strategist, agrees. “I am a monthly partner because I believe it is important to provide consistent support to the WorldCrafts artisans through the Isaiah 58:10 Campaign,” she said. “I know that the money is being used to transform the lives of men and women around the world and give them opportunities to hear of eternal hope.”

When you partner with us, you help spread the love of Christ across the globe.

Mark Johnson, associate pastor at Shades Crest Baptist Church, said, “The WMU Foundation has been instrumental in helping our church connect with Baptists in need all around the world. We have been able to help respond to crises knowing that our funds are accompanied by prayer and ground personnel who are actively ministering through their actions and with their witness.”

When you become a monthly partner with us, you become part of something so much bigger than yourself. Your dollars are always at work, helping combat human trafficking through the Hayes Endowment, sending help to places in need of disaster relief through the WMU HEART Fund, or providing scholarships to missionary kids heading off to college.

And that’s only the beginning. The WMU Foundation has so many other funds and endowments, and we are happy to do whatever we can to help you find your missions passion.

“I consider it a joy to get to be a part of what is being done through WorldCrafts and the WMU Foundation,” concluded Swader. “A monthly donation is an easy way for me to be a consistent financial supporter.”

We hope you’ll choose to partner with us by becoming a monthly donor to the WMU Foundation*. We promise we won’t make you do all the work.


* The WMU Foundation offers automatic monthly giving, making it easier than ever to support your favorite fund or endowment. When you give online, select the option to make this a recurring gift. The card you use will be charged each month for the amount you specify. If you need more information, contact us at wmufoundation@wmu.org or call (205) 408-5525.

Written by Maegan Dockery, Marketing Manager at the WMU Foundation.

A ‘Hero’ Who Held the Missions Banner High

On the day of Betty Malone’s memorial service in early October, everyone stood quietly in the chapel as the flags of the nations rippled down the aisle, carried by the WMU women of First Baptist Church of Jackson, Mississippi.

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The rippling flags portrayed Malone’s love for the nations — and the ripple effect her ministry had for the Kingdom of God. “She loved every nation of the world, she prayed for them and she sent people on mission. She touched generations in her impact for Christ,” said Cindy Townsend, minister of WMU and women’s enrichment activities at First Baptist and former WMU Foundation board member.

Malone served from 1985 to 1991 as the church’s minister of WMU and women’s enrichment activities, the position Townsend serves in now. During that time, Townsend served as the student minister, and they worked closely together to start missions groups for the youth.

Flags of the nations were on display at Betty Malone’s funeral, symbolizing her love for the nations and passion for the Great Commission.

Flags of the nations were on display at Betty Malone’s funeral, symbolizing her love for the nations and passion for the Great Commission.

“She was a missions enthusiast and a radiant Christian woman of God,” Townsend said. “She was so foundational to holding the missions banner high, especially for missions education at our church.”

Malone had been there at a strategic point in time, Townsend said. “She had the ear of the men as well as the women. And whenever the men would want to get something done, she would say with a twinkle in her eye and a big smile, ‘Now if you really want something done in the church, get the WMU to do it. They are the ones who pray and rally people to give and participate.’”

Malone was a trailblazer who impacted many, Townsend said. Not only that — she believed in missions.

Malone loved her family, teaching music and making the name of Jesus Christ known. Her family wrote in her obituary that if there was one organization that was “most dear” to her, it would be WMU.

Cindy Townsend, center, remembers Betty Malone as a woman who prayed for the nations and supported missions throughout her life.

Cindy Townsend, center, remembers Betty Malone as a woman who prayed for the nations and supported missions throughout her life.

At Malone’s memorial service, her son, Drew, shared about how when he and his brothers were growing up, they never knew who was going to be at the dinner table. Frequently they found themselves sitting next to dignitaries and missionaries from all over the world.

Townsend said that was “just Betty” — she had the gift of hospitality and a winsome way that just made you want to get to know her. She was always inviting people into their home.

“If you were around her, she genuinely wanted to know you,” Townsend said.

At the reception after her memorial service, her love for people and the world was evident — it was a “Betty celebration,” Townsend said. Dozens of people stood around having desserts and telling stories about Malone’s life and how she had impacted them. It was “a beautiful tribute to a woman who had a heart for the world,” Townsend said. “She had such a vision for preschool, RAs, GAs, Acteens, Women on Mission — she wanted to impact the Kingdom, and I know she did just that. She definitely impacted me.”

A brick was bought in memory of Betty Malone and her years of holding the missions banner.

A brick was bought in memory of Betty Malone and her years of holding the missions banner.

Learn more about the Walk of Faith at wmufoundation.com/walkoffaith or call (205) 408-5525 for more information. 100% of your gift to the Walk of Faith helps meet the needs of WMU.

Written by Grace Thornton.

The Hayes Endowment: Working Together to Change Lives

The Judith and David Hayes Endowment to Combat Human Trafficking was established in 2006. Since then, over $20,000 has been granted to organizations all over the world. These grants help Christians respond to human trafficking by providing education and awareness, housing and counseling for victims, as well as job skills and business development support for victims coming out of trafficking.

When you give to the Hayes Endowment, you are helping human trafficking victims find hope.

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The Baptist Friendship House in New Orleans recently received a grant and was immediately able to put it to use. “The day we received the grant from the WMU Foundation, we got a call from the National Human Trafficking Hotline,” explained Kay Bennett, executive director of the Baptist Friendship House. She spoke to a young woman who was being trafficked out of a hotel in New Orleans. “Due to receiving the grant, we knew that we would have funds to be able to get her a ticket to get her safely to Florida.”

The young woman has cerebral palsy and walks with the help of a cane. “It broke our hearts to think that someone could be so cruel to sell someone in her condition. It broke my heart more to realize that someone would buy her when they could see that she had a disability,” Bennett continued. Because of the grant they had received hours before, this young woman made it safely to Florida and is doing well. She told Bennett, “I have my Bible and a new beginning.” 

The grant has also helped the Baptist Friendship House purchase supplies for the ladies who work for their new WorldCrafts artisan group. “It is a blessing to be able to teach our ladies a trade and for them to earn fair wages,” Bennett said. “I am amazed how sitting around in a non-threatening environment and doing the pottery helps our ladies to open up and share.” When these women share with each other, that’s when healing starts. 

David George presents Kay Bennett of Baptist Friendship House with the Hayes Endowment award.

David George presents Kay Bennett of Baptist Friendship House with the Hayes Endowment award.

When you give to the Hayes Endowment, you are making a difference.

Dolores Kiser is a long-time donor to the Hayes Endowment. Her eyes were opened to the horrors of human trafficking and the heartbreaking stories when she first saw a story about it in Missions Mosaic. She wanted to help but wasn’t sure how.

The first thing Kiser did was begin to pray for the victims she would read about each month in her magazine. “I made a list of things to do to raise money. One was to ask my grown children to give money to the Hayes Endowment instead of giving me gifts for Mother’s Day, birthdays, and Christmas, which they now do,” Kiser explained. “The Lord is making a way for me to give.”

When you give to the Hayes Endowment, you are partnering with others to share the love of Christ.

There are still victims out there who need our help. Your gifts can change the hopeless to the hopeful as more people come to know Christ. The WMU Foundation grants money from the Hayes Endowment both nationally and internationally each year so that more and more victims all over the world will be free. Please visit wmufoundation.com/stoptrafficking to learn more or to give.

“We are honored to partner with you as we assist trafficking survivors, create awareness, provide trainings, and advocate for stricter laws,” Bennett said. “It takes all of us working together to change lives and change our world.”

Written by Maegan Dockery, Marketing Manager at the WMU Foundation.