prayer

The Resurrection of Easter

Easter. It is resurrection, hope, transformation, life. Easter is what makes the devastation and confusion of Friday make sense.

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For women working their way through Christian Women’s Job Corps (CWJC), Easter is happening each day. For Akevia Wilson, CWJC gave her the skills and support needed to fulfill her dream of becoming a teacher. Though her circumstances once seemed dark, poverty didn’t steal her hope. She now teaches a classroom full of students who know through her example that resurrection is possible.

Everyone involved in CWJC – participants, mentors, volunteers – will tell you resurrection is messy. You can’t erase Friday or take away the pain of the events that led to the resurrection. Sometimes the path to Easter morning is heartbreaking and heavy.

But the hope of rising again is always present because God brings life in hopeless situations and transforms us in the process. Resurrection is always possible. Friday may be full of hopeless problems that can’t be solved and circumstances that leave us broken and grieving. It might feel like an immovable stone blocking the exit from darkness. But Friday isn’t the end.

WMU ministries are about hope and transformation—just like Easter. Your prayers, your financial support, and your involvement can make it possible for women to experience the hope of a new beginning through CWJC.

  • Pray for the hundreds of CWJC participants, volunteers, and mentors who are seeking resurrection today. Ask God to shine light in the darkness of hopeless situations.

  • Financially support CWJC by becoming a monthly partner with your gift to the Dove Endowment. You’ll provide scholarships for participants and grants for sites that are working tirelessly toward transformed lives.

  • Get involved. If you have a local site near you, contact them to find out how you can help. They may have specific prayer needs – commit to be a prayer supporter. They may have requests for supplies or volunteer help or any number of needs you may be able to fulfill.*

Be part of Easter for women across the country. Because Friday doesn’t have to be the end.

*Please contact your local site before collecting any supplies. Each site meets specific needs in their community and has a unique set of needs. Please call before you collect!

A ‘Missions Hero’ Who Pushed Others to Use Their Gifts

When Martha Pitts was a young girl, Mary Quick talked her into going with her to an associational Girls in Action (GA) meeting. Quick asked her if she would say the prayer there.

Pitts assumed it would be a small group.

“I said I would do it. I was probably 10 or 11 years old,” Pitts said. “And we went to this church and it was full of GAs. There were probably 300 GAs in this small church, and I realized I was supposed to get up on stage behind the podium and say the prayer.”

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She panicked a little.

“But Mrs. Quick pushed me on up there,” she said, “and I don’t have a clue what I said or how it was, but ever since then I have never had a fear of talking in front of people.”

And Pitts, now president of Tennessee WMU, said Quick probably had no idea how life changing that moment was for her.

“There are a lot of things I don’t remember from when I was younger, but that experience stuck with me,” she said. “It was one of those encouragements that changes you. I feel like WMU has a niche in that, in helping you develop your skills.”

Quick did that for girl after girl at Whitehaven Baptist Church, hundreds of GAs who grew up through the ranks and were introduced to Quick’s love of missions.

“I loved GAs because of her,” Pitts said. She remembers the coronation services, giant celebrations for girls who had completed their steps. And she remembers as Quick got older and there were fewer GAs doing the work, she kept urging them to persevere.

“She kept after the girls, saying, ‘Come on, you can do it.’ She was an encourager,” Pitts said.

One of Pitts’ fondest memories is the first time Quick introduced her to a missionary who was home on furlough from Indonesia.

“Mrs. Quick didn’t just introduce us to her — she had us hyped up,” Pitts said. “She told the story of who she was and how important her work was, and then we walked down to the pastor’s office and sat around with her and talked.”

Pitts said it was like meeting a star.

“Mrs. Quick just had such honor for missionaries, and she wanted to pass that on,” she said.

It connected the dots for Pitts that missionaries were special people, but they were also real people — a lesson that stayed with her for life.

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It’s because of those moments that Pitts recently honored Quick by purchasing a brick in her memory for the Walk of Faith at WMU headquarters on Missionary Ridge in Birmingham.

“She probably didn't realize when she made me pray in front of the church or allowed me to meet a missionary that it would mold my life,” Pitts said. “By her teaching us Scripture and then showing us how to put action to the words, I learned to pray, give and go.”

One hundred percent of each brick purchase helps meet the needs of WMU. Learn more at wmufoundation.com/walkoffaith or call (205) 408-5525 for more information.