missions

Support WMU Through the WMU Foundation

By Joy Bolton, former Executive Director of Kentucky WMU.

When I saw the Baptist Press headline “WMU Foundation: $512,354 to support national WMU work,” I knew what I needed to write about next on my blog, DiscoverJoy.org. There has been stirring in my heart a message about supporting WMU. I believe it is vital for us to intentionally support National WMU.

I grew up in WMU and have been influenced by WMU’s determination to make disciples of Jesus who live on mission. As I became aware of how the work of WMU was funded, I knew that National WMU received no Cooperative Program funding or dollars from the missions offerings, but instead funded their work through the sales of missions literature and giving through the WMU Foundation. But there is more to the story.

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Past “Recall” Funding

A quick look at A Century to Celebrate by Catherine Allen reminded me that from the time WMU incorporated, they knew they would need funds for literature and communications. “They agreed on three principles: they would receive no missions money, but have the women send it directly to the mission boards for expenditure; the officers would receive no pay; and its expenses would be paid by the mission boards.”

“For more than 66 years the process of WMU funding was commonly known as ‘recalling.’ WMU officers would incur or estimate expenses, then ‘recall’ from the mission boards the amount they wished. Always this was done with reluctance and self-sacrifice, for the women wanted as much money as possible to go to the missions fields” said Allen.

The “recall” system was changed as WMU increasingly supported her work through literature sales and earnings from reserves.

WMU Foundation Established

In 1995, the WMU Foundation was established and has become a significant partner in channeling financial support to WMU. This is more important than ever before.

In an era when publishing has experienced radical change, WMU has struggled at times to sell enough literature to fully fund the national office. This is both a symptom of changing times in our churches and in the distribution of information. People today want to find information and resources at little to no cost on the internet. However, even to give away information on the web, there are production costs which must be funded.

When I have attended meetings with other WMU leaders, we have discussed these challenges. We understand that putting “free” information on the web has costs, and that WMU would love to provide some missions resources to churches on the web while continuing to support those who create and develop the content. This is where you and I come in and can help provide the support needed to produce these resources.

We need to step up and fund National WMU work. There are several ways to do this through the WMU Foundation and WMU:

Funding National WMU

  • Support WMU and WMU Ministries: Purchase WMU literature, WorldCrafts, and other products produced by WMU. Keep your subscriptions current. Don’t be among those who say, “I used to subscribe.” You may be too busy to read every word of Missions Mosaic, but subscribe anyway. This is our flagship magazine and your subscription matters. Give gifts from WorldCrafts that are not only beautiful but provide hope for a better life and share Jesus who gives us hope for eternity.

  • Giving Regularly: Give to support WMU ministries through the WMU Foundation. Give automatically through selecting recurring monthly or quarterly giving. Gifts for various ministries of WMU were among the $512,234 given recently. You can support an hour of ministry by giving $34 to the Vision Fund. You can support missions education for preschoolers by giving to the Dixon Endowment for Mission Friends. You can support leadership development through gifts to a number of endowments. See the Funds and Endowments List and pick one! You can also choose a Touch Tomorrow Today endowment which divides distributions between National WMU and WMU in your state.

  • Estate Gifts: Plan a gift to WMU from your estate. All of us will die. We must decide now, however, where our assets will go if we want to have a say in the distribution. Much of the $512,234 came from earnings on endowments. You may want to establish an endowment with WMU, but you can also specify a dollar amount or percentage to go to an existing endowment. Your wishes must be in writing through a will. Do not assume that your family knows you would want this. Put it in writing. The WMU Foundation can assist you with Planned Giving.

  • Memorial Gifts: Memorial gifts are a great way to honor people who love WMU and missions. Give to a WMU endowment at their passing. Or purchase a brick for the Walk of Faith. 100% of your Walk of Faith gift goes to operational needs of WMU. And let your family know where you would like memorial gifts sent when you die. Again, don’t assume they know. Put it in writing and let them know your wishes. Gifts to support WMU are a great way to honor and be honored.

The National WMU Office is important to all of us. It guides our work together and is the hub for WMU work across the country. WMU has a mandate to fulfill and keeping our home office strong and able to provide the resources we need is vital.

Join me today in supporting WMU!

This article first appeared on DiscoverJoy.org.

Making a Difference on International Women's Day

By Maegan Dockery

If I had my way, I would drop everything and travel the world. I would visit states I’ve never been to and countries I’ve only seen in movies. I would learn about different cultures and eat local cuisine. Unfortunately, I have neither the money nor the means to make this a reality right now, but I have been lucky enough to visit a few new places on mission trips.

When I was in college in Georgia, I went on mission trips to Kentucky, Texas, and East Asia. They weren’t glamorous trips full of sight-seeing and relaxing, but it was a fantastic way to visit new places all while sharing the love of Christ with others.

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That’s what mattered. Traveling is fantastic, but when there’s meaning behind it? I’m all in. Making a difference in the lives of others is important to me, especially when I get the opportunity to share Christ with those who may not otherwise know about Him.

This what I love about Christian Women’s Job Corps (CWJC). There are sites all over the United States where volunteers work hard to teach life skills but also the love of Christ. There are women who are struggling financially or who just need help getting back on their feet, and there are so many tangible ways we can help these women have a brighter future.

CWJC is a place where there is Bible study and prayer but also discipleship through missions. It’s not just a way to find a job. It’s a practical program with a purpose.

What are you doing to share the love of Christ with others? A great starting point is becoming a monthly partner with the WMU Foundation by giving to the Dove Endowment for CWJC. Your monthly gift will help women who are working toward a better future. We can help make the impossible possible for these women.

I may not get the chance to travel the world anytime soon, but I can make a difference right here in my own community, and that is more than enough for now.

Generational Missions Discipleship: A Future to Fulfill

Written by Allison Turner.

Your investment matters.

How do I know it matters? How can I say this with absolute certainty?

Allow me to introduce you to a baby girl: born in 1988.

Her first WMU meeting was the Centennial meeting of WMU emphasizing: A Century to Celebrate, A Future to Fulfill.

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Of course, at 3-months-old there wasn’t much celebration or understanding; but the investments started to be made in her life. Women came alongside her godly parents and poured a deep-rooted passion dripping with love for the nations into their child’s life.

That child was me. Your investment matters.

My first WMU meeting certainly wasn’t my last. Since that time, I have had the honor and privilege of serving WMU on many levels and have seen the absolute treasure that comes in the form of women across the world who pray, give, and go.

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The prayer warriors WMU produces are unmatched. I have been blessed beyond measure to be raised by a mother and grandmother who have proved that to me. Melvadeen Friday and Denise Henderson poured their lives out for the sake of God’s work among the nations through our missionaries. Tears have been shed and countless hours of sleep have been lost for the sake of furthering His kingdom. And the beauty is: they are not alone.

We may never know how many men and women pick up their Missions Mosaic every day and weep over the lives and struggles of our missionaries serving (even those whose names we cannot know).

My brothers and I always knew that if the door was closed in the Florida room at home, it was God’s time. (And you don’t disturb God while Mama is talking to Him!) This wasn’t sporadic. Every single day Mama was faithful to invest in the lives of missionaries and those they would be serving through her prayers.

It was easy to develop a love for missionaries with this upbringing. I prayed all my life for opportunities to go and serve alongside these missionaries I’d been taught to love so well. I tried to go to different places—China, Russia, Swaziland, the list goes on—but none ever came to fruition. I was always left stateside praying for those who went.

Then, the opportunity came this year. This year, I got to go on the most special trip imaginable for a WMU baby like me. I had a few opportunities to go out into a lost nation and serve. But the main point of our trip was to serve missionaries. I was able to go with a small team on a 27-hour flight to bring a women’s retreat to 40 IMB missionaries. These beautiful servants I’d been praying for since I learned how to pray. I would get to serve them! And I cannot fully explain the absolute joy I experienced in those few days filled with laughter, tears, and new friendships that will certainly last a lifetime.

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Because I of the investment of WMU women instilling in me a passion for those who serve on our frontlines, I was able to pray for these women missionaries serving in hard places. I was able to listen to their stories and share them with others who will pray.

Specifically, because of the investment of my grandmother, Melvadeen, and my mother, Denise, the trajectory of my life has been set towards missions. Missions here, missions abroad, missions everywhere I go.

To the young mother who is exhausted and trying to sneak in quality time with God: those babies are watching. Let them know He’s important.

To the businesswoman rushing around to meet deadlines: your co-workers see you. Let them see God’s love in you.

To the retiree feeling like your purpose has been fulfilled: someone is waiting for you to speak life to them. Let those who come behind you find you faithful.

Your investment matters.

Did a mother or grandmother pour their missions heart into your life? Honor them or their memory through the Walk of Faith.

Long-Term Investments: The Payoff of Missions Education

Written by Kelly King, Women’s Ministry Specialist at LifeWay Christian Resources.

I’m not an expert at financial planning, but I learned some simple investment principles when I began working at a financial institution full-time right after college.

Invest early. Save consistently. Reap rewards later. Time is your friend.

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These simple principles were great advice for financial help, but I also saw these principles displayed in the life of one of my mission mentors. Othella Thompson was my next-door neighbor from the time I was born until my family moved when I was in fourth grade. She and her husband Bill raised three boys in the home where she lived until she passed away a year ago at the age of 81.

While she never mentioned wanting a daughter, Mrs. Thompson taught my Girls in Action (GA) class at the small church plant where my family attended and where I came to know the Lord. Our church rarely broke the 100 mark in attendance, but Mrs. Thompson faithfully taught our GA class during my early grade school years. Occasionally, she sang solos in the worship service and her shrill soprano voice was a source of suppressed giggles among my friends and me.

For the most part, I was a fairly compliant child and loved learning about Jesus. Those early years learning about missions and missionaries were foundational stones that shaped my heart and made me tender towards others who sacrificed so others could hear the gospel.

Unfortunately, Mrs. Thompson didn’t always see how I was being shaped. For some reason, every Wednesday evening, I gave Mrs. Thompson trouble. I was a bit sassy and a bit of a know-it-all. Some people might say some things haven’t changed, but I always seemed a bit rebellious during that hour. She would gently scold me, and remind me that my behavior was unbecoming. She desperately tried to help me be a young lady, but she also challenged our group of girls to get dirty and serve others. I still remember our class planting flowers at church and how I shuddered at the thought of digging in the dirt. Even so, she smiled and encouraged us to serve Jesus by serving our church and serving others.

We may have literally planted those seeds, but she “planted” the seeds of missions into our young lives. I still remember learning about various countries, praying for missionaries, giving to mission offerings, and learning how we serve a big God who cares about the eternity of the entire world.

It would be years later before Mrs. Thompson would see the fruit of those seeds.

When my husband and I married, we began the task of finding a church. Because we taught teenagers at two different churches, one of our first big decisions was determining where God wanted us to serve together. After a few months, we joined the church where Vic was already a member. He had established relationships, but I was looking for ways I could be involved and make new friends. In a few months, I made the decision to join the church choir.

As I entered the choir room, I found a place among the alto section and tried hard to fit into the group. As I looked around the room, a familiar face waved from the soprano section. It was Mrs. Thompson! Little did I know she was a member of the same church. She quickly made her way towards me, hugged my neck, and welcomed me. In the back of my mind, all I could think of was the way I had misbehaved as a young girl. A few weeks later, I mustered the courage to approach her and ask her forgiveness. She winked and smiled, “I don’t remember any of that and I’m so proud of who you are today.”

For the next 29 years, Mrs. Thompson saw the rewards of investing in a small group of GA girls. She saw my calling into ministry and how God opened opportunities for me to serve. Each time we had a conversation, she would tell me how proud she was and how she prayed for me.

Even so, the reality is: I know her long-term investment in a young girl was the greatest gift I could be given. The impact of teaching girls about God’s word and God’s world was the payoff of a faithful woman who answered the call to teach missions education. That’s a great investment.

Who invested in you?

CHECK OUT THE WALK OF FAITH TO honor Those who made long-term investments in your life.